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Frequently Asked Questions

General FAQs

What if a plastibell has not fallen off by 7 days?

It can take up to 12 days for a plastibell to fall off, every patient is an individual.

What can I give my child if they run out of prescribed pain meds?

Your child may have Tylenol or ibuprofen.

When can my child return to school and resume activities?

Your child may return to school and resume activities based on your surgeon’s instructions at the time of discharge.

When can my child travel after surgery?

Your child should not travel long distances until after the first post-op visit.

Whom do I call when my child is sick before surgery?

ALWAYS call our office at 413-794-2442.

Whom do I call to change my surgery date?

ALWAYS call our office at 413-794-2442.

When can I bathe or shower my child?

Your child may bathe or shower three days after surgery unless the surgeon instructs differently due to the nature of the surgery.

Do you circumcise children in the office?

No - All circumcisions are performed at the hospital.

Do I need to bring my child to all appointments?

Yes – You must bring your child to all appointments.

Does your office provide language interpreters? (i.e. Spanish, Russian, Somalian, Vietnamese)

If you request interpreter services when you make your appointment, Baystate Medical Center's Interpreter Services can provide live or telephonic interpretation at our office or in the hospital in more than 70 languages as well as American Sign Language.  

Does a legal guardian need to accompany a patient under the age of 18?

Yes, we are unable to see or treat a patient under 18 unless a legal guardian is present.

Do I need to bring all films and reports to my child’s office visit?

Yes, all relevant films and medical records must be brought to all appointments.

Do you take "walk-ins"?

No. All visits are by appointment only.

What are the scheduled office hours?

The office is open Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Patient appointments are Monday through Thursday 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm and Fridays 9:00 am to 12:30 pm.

When can I remove the surgical dressing?

Most surgical dressings are removed by the surgeon at the first post op visit, unless otherwise specified by your surgeon.

What if my child has had no bowel movement in 2-3 days? When should I be concerned?

Increase fluid intake and offer foods high in fiber. If no bowel movement by day 3 postoperatively, contact the office.


C.A.T. Scan FAQs

What is the test?

A C.A.T. Scan produces highly detailed pictures by combining advanced X-ray machines with specially programmed computers. These detailed pictures can provide cross-sectional views (like slices through an orange) of just about any organ or bone in the body.

 

What preparation is needed?

The scan itself requires no preparation. However, you may want to eat lightly on the day of the scan. To enhance the detail of the C.A.T. scan pictures, the doctor may inject an iodine-based medicine into one of your veins during the scan. For abdominal C.A.T. scan, you may be given this medicine orally. In either form, the iodine may make you feel slightly nauseous.

If your child is allergic to shellfish or iodine, you should tell the doctor. You may be asked to sign a consent form for the medicine. Be sure to remove any barrettes, safety pins, or jewelry before the scan begins. Metal, plastic and other materials can interfere with the X-rays. Children may bring special toys to the X-ray department, but may not take these toys into the actual test.

 

Where is the test done?

Radiology (X-ray) North Campus at Baystate Medical Center, 759 Chestnut Street, Springfield in the Daly building. You will be brought to the area after you have checked in at Patient Registration and been admitted to the patient unit.

 

How is the test done?

C.A.T. scan machines look like a donut. You will lie on your back on a table that moves slightly up and back, about an inch at a time, as one section after another is scanned.

 

What can I expect after the test?

The scan itself is painless. You may feel uncomfortable from having to lie still for long periods of time. If you receive an injection of iodine dye, you may notice a salty or metallic taste in your mouth. The scan leaves no after effects. The total radiation it exposes you to is no more than a regular X-ray.


Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) FAQs

What is the test?

IVP is an X-ray examination of the kidney, ureters, and bladder.

 

What preparation is needed?

Does your child have any allergies? If so, please tell the X-ray technician.

Your child should not eat any solid food the morning of the exam. He/she should, however, drink an extra amount of fluids.

 

Where is the test done?

Radiology (X-ray), Nuclear Medicine, North Campus, 759 Chestnut Street, in the Daly building.

 

How is the test done?

After injection of a contrast agent into a vein, timed X-rays are taken to look at the kidney, ureters, and bladder.

 

What can I expect after the test?

Your child may return to normal activities after the test.


Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) FAQs

What is the test?

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique that uses magnetic energy and radio waves rather than X-ray to produce a detailed "picture" of the human body. There is no known risk associated with magnetic energy nor is there any radiation exposure.

 

What preparation is needed?

No preparation is needed. Pretest sedation may be given to the young child. All jewelry and johnnys with snaps must be removed prior to testing.

 

Where is the test done?

MRI suite, Baystate Medical Center North Campus, 759 Chestnut Street, Daly building.

 

How is the test done?

The child will be positioned comfortably lying on the examining table. The table itself slides the child into the magnet (which is a large cylinder that houses the MRI magnets).

If the child is not sedated, he/she will hold a call button similar to that used in a hospital room At any time, the child can press the button for assistance. There is also two-way communication with technicians who are in a separate control booth throughout the examination.

The most important thing for the child to do during the examination is to remain as still as possible so that the images will be clear. When the scans ("pictures") are made, he/she will hear a fairly loud rapid tapping noise, similar to that of a drum. The child will not feel any effects from these noises.

The exam usually lasts from 20 minutes to one hour.

 

What can I expect after the test?

The child may return to normal activities after the test.


Renal Scan with Lasix FAQs

What is the test?

This test gives information about the function and excretion capability of the kidneys.

 

What preparation is needed?

Your child will drink one to two glasses of water or any liquid before the study.

 

Where is the test done?

Radiology (X-ray), Nuclear Medicine, Baystate Medical Center North Campus, 759 Chestnut Street, Daly building.

 

How is the test done?

Your child will be given an injection of a small dose of radioactive material (Technetium) into a vein. Your child will be positioned on a special stretcher with a camera positioned under the table in the area of his/her kidneys. Thirty to sixty minute later images will be evaluated to see if there is evidence of hydronephrosis. If there is hydronephrosis, an injection of Lasix will be slowly given and images will be continued for another 30-60 minutes. The study will take about one to one and a half hours.

 

What can I expect after the test?

Your child should have no discomfort, and may return to normal activities after the test.

The technologist performing the examination will be happy to answer any questions concerning the test before beginning.


Ultrasound – Pelvic

What is the test?

Pelvic ultrasound examines body structure by means of sound waves. In obstetrical patients, the test evaluates fetal position and structure.

 

What preparation is needed?

You will be asked to drink six to eight lasses of fluid one and a half to two hours before the test. You will be asked not to void before the test. A full bladder serves as a landmark to define other pelvic organs.

 

Where is the test done?

Radiology (X-ray), Baystate Medical Center North Campus, 759 Chestnut Street, Daly building. You will be directed to the area after your have checked in at Patient Registration.

 

What can I expect after the test?

You may return to your normal activities after the test.


Ultrasound – Renal or Bladder

What is the test?

Renal/bladder ultrasound detects any solid or cystic masses, obstructions or other abnormalities, the size of the kidneys and the amount of urine left in the bladder after urination.

 

What preparation is needed?

Renal ultrasound: No preparation is needed.

Bladder ultrasound: Your child must drink several glasses of water, depending on his/her size, one hour before the test and not urinate once he/she has started drinking the water, if possible.

 

Where is the test done?

Radiology (X-ray), Baystate Medical Center North Campus, 759 Chestnut Street, Daly Building

 

How is the test done?

Your child will be asked to remove some clothing and lie in various positions. A small amount of lubricant will be applied to the skin and to the ultrasound probe. The lubricant will feel wet and sticky. The probe will then be placed on the ski over the area of the kidneys or bladder as pictures are taken. Approximate duration of the exam is 30-45 minutes.

 

What can I expect after the test?

The test is painless. Your child may return to normal activities after the test.

The technologist performing the exam will be happy to answer any questions concerning the test.


Voiding Cysto Urethrogram (VCUG) FAQs

What is the test?

This is an X-ray examination of the bladder and urethra, which looks at the structure of the lower urinary tract and the bladder’s ability to empty completely.

 

What preparation is needed?

None. If your child has any allergies, please report these to the X-ray technician.

 

Where is the test done?

Radiology (X-ray), Nuclear Medicine, Baystate Medical Center North Campus, 759 Chestnut Street, Daly building.

 

How is the test done?

The test involves the insertion of a catheter into the urinary bladder. This may cause mild discomfort. The catheter will be attached to a bag with saline solution in it. A small amount of radioactive material will be injected into the catheter so it will mix with the urine in the bladder. Your child will lie on his/her back on the table and the gamma camera will be positioned behind them in the area of the urinary bladder. The saline will be administered into the urinary bladder while the data is being collected until there is a definite urgency to void. Following that, a voiding phase will be started with data collected on a computer.

 

What can I expect after the test?

Your child should have no discomfort, and may return to normal activities after the test.



The technologist performing the examination will be happy to answer any questions you or your child may have concerning the test before beginning.