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EMS Training benefits Rays of Hope

October 23, 2013
 

Contact:

Michelle Holmgren, Public Affairs & Community Relations Specialist

(Office) 413-967-2296 (Cell) 413-237-6743

michelle.holmgren@baystatehealth.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Ware, MA (October 22, 2013) Once an EMT becomes certified, the clock begins ticking toward recertification. Within two years, they must earn 28 hours of continuing education and complete a 24 hour Department of Transportation (DOT) refresher course. Throughout the year, monthly, Emergency Department Physician’s at Baystate Mary Lane Hospital offer continuing education classes to area EMTs.

The DOT Refresher Course, a 24 hour refresher of EMT skills, is something that Nurse-Paramedic Mike Callahan has held at the hospital annually, joining the team of health care providers that work to ensure that local EMTs are able to meet the necessary requirements of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Office of Emergency Services to maintain their certification.

 

Callahan, who resides in Palmer said, “The refresher is something that I have offered to area EMTs at the hospital for over 10 years, and have always enjoyed doing. The DOT refresher is always filled with so many experienced and dedicated EMTs. It’s gratifying for me to do the research before the training; I’m always learning something new and bringing that information to the EMS Providers.”

This year Callahan waived the $35.00 course fee and in lieu of payment, participants were asked to make a donation to the Rays of Hope – A Walk & Run Toward the Cure of Breast Cancer in recognition of their 20th Anniversary. “We have all been touched by cancer in some way,” said Callahan. “I decided to donate the proceeds of the class to Rays of Hope because a dear friend of mine was recently diagnosed with breast cancer,” said Callahan. “October is breast cancer awareness month and Rays of Hope has helped to make great strides in the battle against this disease.”

 

The Nurse Paramedic, who has been an EMS provider for over 30 years, noted that teaching comes naturally, so does giving. “There is no limit to how much you can help people,’ said Callahan. “A life well lived is a life that has touched others. I am honored to give of my time and talents in honor of my friend and all those touched by cancer.”

Since its inception in 1994, Rays of Hope has been helping women and men in the fight against breast cancer by supporting research at the Rays of Hope Center for Breast Cancer Research and also by walking along side them on their cancer journey. For information about Rays of Hope visit www.baystatehealth.org/raysofhope

 
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