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Sexual and Fertility Changes

 

What they are

Radiation therapy sometimes causes sexual changes, which can include hormone changes and loss of interest in or ability to have sex. It can also affect fertility during and after radiation therapy. For a woman, this means that she might not be able to get pregnant and have a baby. For a man, this means that he might not be able to get a woman pregnant. Sexual and fertility changes differ for men and women.

 

Be sure to tell your doctor if you are pregnant before you start radiation therapy.

 

Problems for women include:

  • Pain or discomfort when having sex
  • Vaginal itching, burning, dryness, or atrophy (when the muscles in the vagina become weak and the walls of the vagina become thin)
  • Vaginal stenosis, when the vagina becomes less elastic, narrows, and gets shorter
  • Symptoms of menopause for women not yet in menopause. These include hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and not having your period.
  • Not being able to get pregnant after radiation therapy is over

 

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Radiation to the shaded areas may cause

sexual and fertility changes.

Problems for men include:

  • Impotence (also called erectile dysfunction or ED), which means not being able to have or keep an erection
  • Not being able to get a woman pregnant after radiation therapy is over due to fewer or less effective sperm
 

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Why they occur

Sexual and fertility changes can happen when people get radiation therapy to the pelvic area. For women, this includes radiation to the vagina, uterus, or ovaries. For men, this includes radiation to the testicles or prostate. Many sexual side effects are caused by scar tissue from radiation therapy. Other problems, such as fatigue, pain, anxiety, or depression, can affect your interest in having sex.

 

How long they last

After radiation therapy is over, most people want to have sex as much as they did before treatment. Many sexual side effects go away after treatment ends. But you may have problems with hormone changes and fertility for the rest of your life. If you are able to get pregnant or father a child after you have finished radiation therapy, it should not affect the health of the baby.

 

Ways to manage

 

For both men and women, it is important to be open and honest with your spouse or partner about your feelings, concerns, and how you prefer to be intimate while you are getting radiation therapy.

 

FOR WOMEN, here are some issues to discuss with your doctor or nurse:

  • Fertility. Before radiation therapy starts, let your doctor or nurse know if you think you might want to get pregnant after your treatment ends. He or she can talk with you about ways to preserve your fertility, such as preserving your eggs to use in the future.
  • Sexual problems. You may or may not have sexual problems. Your doctor or nurse can tell you about side effects you can expect and suggest ways for coping with them.
  • Birth control. It is very important that you do not get pregnant while having radiation therapy. Radiation therapy can hurt the fetus at all stages of pregnancy. If you have not yet gone through menopause, talk with your doctor or nurse about birth control and ways to keep from getting pregnant.
  • Pregnancy. Make sure to tell your doctor or nurse if you are already pregnant.
  • Stretching your vagina. Vaginal stenosis is a common problem for women who have radiation therapy to the pelvis. This can make it painful to have sex. You can help by stretching your vagina using a dilator (a device that gently stretches the tissues of the vagina). Ask your doctor or nurse where to find a dilator and how to use it.
  • Lubrication. Use a special lotion for your vagina (such as Replens┬«) once a day to keep it moist. When you have sex, use a water- or mineral oil-based lubricant (such as K-Y Jelly┬« or Astroglide┬«).
  • Sex. Ask your doctor or nurse whether it is okay for you to have sex during radiation therapy. Most women can have sex, but it is a good idea to ask and be sure. If sex is painful due to vaginal dryness, you can use a water- or mineral oil-based lubricant.
 

Talk to your doctor or nurse if you want to have children in the future.


FOR MEN, here are some issues to discuss with your doctor or nurse:

  • Fertility. Before you start radiation therapy, let your doctor or nurse know if you think you might want to father children in the future. He or she may talk with you about ways to preserve your fertility before treatment starts, such as banking your sperm. Your sperm will need to be collected before you begin radiation therapy.
  • Impotence. Your doctor or nurse can let you know whether you are likely to become impotent and how long it might last. Your doctor can prescribe medicine or other treatments that may help.
  • Sex. Ask if it is okay for you to have sex during radiation therapy. Most men can have sex, but it is a good idea to ask and be sure.
 

If you want to father children in the future,

your sperm will need to be collected before you begin treatment.