print this page

Cardiovascular Testing

A Service of Baystate Medical Center

 

There are many tests and procedures available to help determine if a person has cardiovascular disease, the type of disease, the severity, and the most effective treatment methods.   Definitions, description and special instructions will be provided in this section. If you have any questions about your test or procedure, it is very important to talk to your doctor and care team.

 

Types of Tests
Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG): a recording of the electrical currents that cause the heart to beat. During this short and painless procedure, an ECG technician places electrodes—sensing devices—on your chest, arms, and legs.
Holter Monitor: is a special way of observing your heart over an extended period of time using a portable 24 or 48 hour ECG. 
Cardiobeeper/Event Recorder: a small pocket-sized heart monitor you carry for one month. The monitor makes a recording of irregular heart­beats for your doctor to review and evaluate.
Loop Monitor: a small pocket-sized 30-day heart monitor. The monitor makes a recording of irregular heartbeats for your doctor to review and evaluate.
Echocardiogram (Cardiac Ultrasound): This test can help identify such problems as narrowing or leaking of valves, heart defects such as abnormal communication between the right and left sides of the heart, and heart muscle malfunction.
Exercise Stress Echocardiogram: one way of seeing how your heart works during rest and exercise.
Dobutamine Stress Echocardiogram: In this test, you’ll be given gradual doses of a medication called Dobutamine through an intravenous line (IV) in your arm while an echocardiogram is done. Your doctor uses this information to evaluate how your heart is working and how it reacts to the drug.
Transesophageal Echocardiogram:This is a procedure where physicians obtain ultrasound images of the heart from a probe positioned in the esophagus.
Stress Test
Exercise Stress Test: a safe way to put stress on the heart in a controlled setting. This test may be performed in a variety of ways: it involves walking on a treadmill, or it may involve receiving intravenous (IV) medications which simulate the effect of exercise on the heart. In either case, your cardiologist may also prescribe x-ray pictures of the blood flow to your heart (also called “nuclear imaging”), which involves giving you IV medications.
Nuclear Stress Test: During this test, a small amount of radioactive tracer is injected into a vein. A special camera detects the radiation released by the tracer to produce computer images of the heart.  Combined with exercise, the test can help determine if there is adequate blood flow to the heart during activity versus at rest.
Nuclear Adenosine Stress Test: During the test, a small amount of radioactive tracer is injected into a vein. A special camera detects the radiation released by the tracer to produce computer images of the heart. Combined with a medication called adenosine (Adenoscan), the test can help determine if there is adequate blood flow to the heart during activity versus at rest.

Locations

Baystate Cardiology
3300 Main Street
Springfield MA, 01199
Phone: (413) 794-7246
Fax: (413) 794-0198


Non-Invasive Cardiology
3300 Main Street, Suite 2B
Springfield MA, 01199
Phone: (413) 794-7484


Baystate Vascular Services
3500 Main Street - Suite 201
Springfield MA, 01107
Phone: 413-794-0900
Contact Us


Baystate Heart & Vascular Program
48 Sanderson Street
Greenfield MA, 01386
Phone: 855-414-0240 (Toll Free)


Baystate Vascular Lab
759 Chestnut Street
Springfield MA, 01107
Phone: (413) 794-3773