print this page

Frequently Asked Questions


What should I know about Blepharoplasty (eyelid) Surgery?


What should I know about Liposuction?


What is Breast Reconstruction?


What should I know about Breast Reduction surgery?


What should I know about Brow lift surgery?


What should I know about Hand surgery?


What should I know about Rhinoplasty (nasal surgery)?


What should I know about Skin graft surgery?


What should I know about Facelift surgery?


What should I know about Blepharoplasty (eyelid) Surgery?

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery, since it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed use Tylenol instead. (i.e., No AlkaSeltzer, Anacin, Ascriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon Compound, Fiorinal, Dristan, Empirin, Excedrin, Midol, Sine-Aid, Sine-Off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminicin, Vanquish, etc. If in doubt, check with us). 
  • Smokers should try to quit or at least cut down to no more than three or four cigarettes a day for three days before surgery to reduce postoperative coughing and possible bleeding. 
  • Report any signs of a cold, infection, boils or pustules appearing one week before surgery. 
  • Arrange for someone to drive you to your home, hotel or motel after surgery.

 

NIGHT BEFORE SURGERY

  • Nothing to eat or drink after midnight unless otherwise stated.

 

DAY OF SURGERY

  • No make-up. Do not cream your face.
  • Do not take medication of any kind (unless instructed by your plastic surgeon), except your blood pressure, diabetic or heart medication, etc.).
  • Wear comfortable, loose fitting clothing which do not have to be put on over your head.
  • Bring sunglasses to wear after your operation.
  • You must have someone drive you home after surgery.
  • You must have someone spend the first night with you. Additional instructions and prescriptions can be given to the person calling for you. Such prescriptions should be filled promptly. If you have any questions before your operation please call our office weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at (413) 794-5363 or (866) 567-3685. After hours, please call the main number for our 24 hr answering service.

 

AFTER YOUR SURGERY

  • Take medications according to instructions on bottle. If taking narcotics, or if other pain medications make you feel "spacey" or drowsy, have someone else give you your medicines according to the proper time intervals. Under such circumstances you could forget and take them too often.
  • Apply cool compresses to your eyelids consisting of gauze pads or a clean washcloth. You may be advised to use ice. This is soothing and helps control swelling.
  • No hot or warm compresses!
  • Avoid smoking for 48 hours after your operation to prevent coughing and possible bleeding.
  • You can expect:

–  Moderate discomfort - use pain medicine (See #1 above).

–  Moderate swelling.

–  Black and blue discoloration.

–  Bloodshot eyes.

–  Moderate bleeding from wound edges.

  • Call if you have:

–  Severe pain not responding to medications.

–  Marked swelling, or obviously more swelling on one side than the other.

–  Significant changes in vision (anything more than mild blurring).

–  Any other questions or problems arise.

  • You may wash your hair after the sutures come out (three to five days, not counting the day of surgery). Dry with towel or cool dryer. DO NOT SIT UNDER A HOT DRYER. May set with rollers. 
  • You may read or watch television if you feel up to it; although you can expect to have slightly blurred vision for the first day or two after surgery.
  • You may wear eye make-up on the fifth day after surgery.
  • Avoid prolonged exposure to the sun and heat for one month to avoid swelling.
  • Call us if with any questions or problems from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at (413) 794-5363 or (866) 597-7874. After hours, please call (413) 794-5363 for our 24 hr answering service.

 

OFFICE VISITS

  • First: Three to five days following surgery at such time your sutures will be removed.

Return to top


What should I know about Liposuction?

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery because it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed, use Tylenol instead ( i.e., No Alka Seltzer, Anacin, Acriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon Compound, Fiornal, Dristan, Excedrin, Midol, Sine-Aid, Sine-off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminicin, Vanquish, etc. If in doubt, check with us.)
  • If general anesthesia is planned smokers should quit. Try to cut down to no more than three, four or less cigarettes per day for two weeks before surgery to reduce postoperative coughing.
  • Report any signs of a cold and/or fever within one week of your surgery.
  • You must arrange for someone to drive you home after surgery, and stay with you for 24 hours.
  • Liposuction is done as an outpatient. This means you will have your surgery and return home the same day.
  • The hospital will contact you if Pre-testing is needed.

 

AFTER SURGERY 

  • Bed rest for the first 24 hours.
  • You may go to the bathroom as needed. DO NOT REMOVE GIRDLE.
  • Take medications according to instructions on the bottle. Have someone else give you your medicine according to the correct time intervals. While under its influence, you might forget or take it too often.
  • The period of greatest discomfort generally occurs 2 to 3 days after surgery and does not last more than 12 – 14 hours. Thereafter, you may find that you need the pain medicine less frequently. You may want to switch to Tylenol.
  • Placing well padded ice bags over the area for the first 24 hours often relieves discomfort significantly.
  • Call your doctor if you have: a. Severe pain not responding to pain medication. b. More swelling and/or pain on one side than the other.
  • You may have some discomfort for 4-5 days.
  • You can expect:

– Some pain

– Some numbness

– Swelling

– Bruising (may be severe)

  • You may gradually increase your more vigorous activities beginning at 3 weeks through 6 weeks.
  • No sexual activity for three weeks (rubbing action may disrupt skin adhering to underlying tissues).
  • Doctor’s appointment 1 week from surgery. At this time the doctor will remove your compression garment for the first time. Please call 794-5363 for a post-op appointment if you do not already have one scheduled.
  • You must wear your compression garment day and night (except to bathe) for 5 more weeks (total of six weeks).
  • After 6 weeks you should wear your compression garment as much as possible up to 3 months.
  • Expect swelling to last for as long as 3 months.

 

RETURN TO WORK

  • Chin/neck as early as next day.
  • Abdomen/thighs as early as 3-4 days.
  • Consult with your physician. It depends on the type of work you do.

 

THINGS TO REMEMBER

  • No insurance company pays for this type of surgery. This also includes any complications of the surgery, which may include admission to the hospital.
  • You may not see any difference between the pre and postoperative results for as long as 3 months. This is due to the swelling, which is a normal occurrence of this operation.
  • The most common complication of this operation may be some asymmetry (difference in the appearance on one side to the other.) If you have any questions or problems, please feel free to call us weekdays at 413-794-5363 or our toll free number at 866-567-3685 during the hours of 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. For emergency situations after office hours, please call (413) 794-5363.

Return to top


What is Breast Reconstruction?

Breast reconstruction may be done at the time of mastectomy or at a later date. The best option depends upon age, present physical status, extent of the disease and the need for other treatments (i.e. radiation, chemotherapy, etc.). There are several options for reconstruction which should be discussed with a plastic surgeon. Women are encouraged to decide if breast reconstruction is right for them.

 

Insurance companies may provide coverage for breast reconstruction but you should contact your insurance company to check on coverage for breast reconstruction procedures.

Return to top


What should I know about Breast Reduction surgery?

THE PROCEDURE

Large, heavy breasts can be painful due to excessive weight. This excess weight also causes strain in the neck and shoulders, leading to backache and headache. From this heavy load, the bra straps may cut into the skin, and can even cause notching above the collarbone!

 

How is the breast reduction done?

Breast reduction surgery involves removal of excess breast tissue with reshaping and lifting of the breast. The incisions are similar to those used for more extensive breast lifts. Your doctor will discuss the various methods of breast reduction, and explain the technique that may be best suited for you. Because of the functional problems associated with abnormally large breasts, insurance will often cover the cost of this type of surgery. Although light activities can be resumed within a few days following the surgical procedure, routine physical activity and exercising should be avoided for several weeks. Your doctor will advise you on this particular question.

How long does a breast reduction take?

Surgery generally requires approximately two hours per breast; depending on the technique of reduction that your surgeon feels is best for you.

Will I have to stay in the hospital?

This surgery can usually be performed as an outpatient. However, if you have any complications or your surgeon deems it necessary, you will be admitted for an overnight stay.

Do I need to be put to sleep for the surgery?

Because of the extent of the operation, it is usually done under general anesthesia. In some cases, instead of general anesthesia, you may choose to have sedation (this will make you drowsy and comfortable during the surgery, but you will not be completely asleep.) Discuss your preferences and options with your surgeon. 

How safe is it?

All surgery has some potential risks, including bleeding, allergy to the anesthetic, and infection. In this surgery, serious complications are quite rare, but there is often significant blood loss due to the magnitude of the surgery. In addition, a small area of infection or delayed healing in the incisions is not uncommon. All surgery has the risks of scarring, bleeding, and infection. Each of these risks are common in this surgery, but they are almost always localized to the breast tissue. If treated properly, they usually do not pose major health risks to the rest of the body. You will need to work with your doctor, and carefully follow all instructions in order to minimize the risks from these problems. Finally, the scars from this surgery are quite long, and sometimes become wide or thick with time.

Does it hurt?

Although the surgical incision for this surgery is quite large, fortunately it is placed in areas of the breast that are not too sensitive. In addition, because the nerves to the breast skin have been stretched out by the weight of the breasts over a long period of time, the skin is less sensitive. Thus, pain after the surgery is surprisingly little, and usually tolerable with medication. There is discomfort in walking, getting out of bed, and any activity that “jiggles” the breasts for a few days; but this also resolves. During the surgery, the area would be numb, you would be asleep, or both; and it would not hurt at all.

How long do the results last?

The breasts will remain smaller than they were if the surgery had never been performed. Unfortunately, gravity does continue to work and in time, will sag again. In addition, the remaining breast tissue will continue to respond like any breast tissue by getting bigger if you gain weight, take hormones, or get pregnant, etc.

Is there much scarring?

The scarring from this operation is extensive. The scars will be long, and remain pink or brown for several months. They can become wide or thick with time. After months, the scars may become faded and not noticeable, but you cannot count on this. Fortunately, the scars are placed in areas that are not seen unless you are topless, and can be hidden by most traditional bathing suits. 

How long until I can go back to work?

You will be pretty sore for the first few days after surgery; therefore, you may want to stay home from work. You will need to discuss this further with your doctor.

How long before I can resume normal activities?

Most normal activities can be resumed within a few days, although your chest will still be sore. You should avoid strenuous activity for at least six weeks in order to give things a chance to heal properly. If you have delayed healing in parts of the incision (a common occurrence), this would delay your recovery even longer.

What benefit could I expect from the surgery?

This surgery is designed to reduce the weight of the breasts in order to make it easier for you to be active. Hopefully, this will relieve the pressure on your back, neck and shoulders that can cause stiffness, aching, and headache. Thus, although you will get a breast lift, the primary benefit of the operation is functional, and not just cosmetic. However, you do get a breast lift in the surgery, which may enhance your body image.

What are the alternatives?

Weight loss can often reduce the size of the breasts, and should be tried first. We do recognize that weight loss is not easy, and some women’s breasts are excessively large, even when they are quite thin. Hormonal manipulation is not currently recommended. Liposuction of the breasts can reduce the size of the breasts without causing significant scarring, but most women do not choose this option because it makes the breasts sag more (since the size of the skin is not reduced).

Special Instructions

As mentioned above, it is very important to make sure that there is no infection or bleeding in the breast after the surgery. You must, therefore, be very careful to protect the breasts, keep them clean, and carefully follow your doctor’s instructions. This information is only intended as an introduction to this procedure. It should not be used to determine whether you will have the procedure performed, nor to guarantee the result. The best method of determining your options would be to consult surgeons who are accessible to answer all of your questions.

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery, since it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed, use Tylenol instead. (i.e., No Advil, AlkaSeltzer, Anacin, Ascriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon Compound, Fiorinal, Dristan, Empirin, Excedrin, Midol, Motrin, Sine-Aid, Sine-Off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminicin, Vanquish, etc. If in doubt, check with us). Also no Vitamin E for two weeks before surgery. (Note: multivitamin preparations may contain Vitamin E. Please check the label before taking.)
  • Smokers should quit. If you cannot, then try to cut down to no more than three or four cigarettes a day for three days before surgery.
  • Report any signs of a cold, infection, boils, or pimples appearing within one week before surgery.
  • Please bring a list of medications and dosages with you to your preadmission testing appointment.
  • Arrange for someone to drive you to your home after surgery.

 

NIGHT BEFORE SURGERY

  • NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK AFTER MIDNIGHT.
  • Follow instructions as above.

 

DAY OF SURGERY

  • Do not take medications of any kind (unless instructed or prescribed by the doctor), unless it is your heart or blood pressure medications. If unsure, check with our office.
  • Leave all personal belongings at home except comfortable loose-fitting clothing that do not have to be put on over your head. Bring a good bra without an underwire. This will help hold your dressing in place and serve as a comfort measure during your healing phase.
  • You must have someone to drive you home after surgery. If you have any questions before your operation, please call our office weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at 413-794-5363 or toll free 866-567-3685. After hours please call the main number for our 24-hour answering service. 

 

AFTER YOUR SURGERY

  • You will stay one night in the hospital.
  • You may go to the bathroom as needed.
  • Take medications (pain medicines and antibiotics) according to instructions on bottles. Have someone else give you your pain medicine according to the correct time intervals. While under its influence, you might forget and take it too often.
  • The periods of greatest discomfort generally occurs for two to three days after surgery. Thereafter, you may find that you need the pain medicine less frequently.
  • Drains will be placed in the breasts during surgery. These will be removed the day after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you have:
    • Severe pain not responding to pain medications.
    • More swelling and/or pain on one side than the other.
    • If bandages seem too tight.
    • If any other questions or problems arises.
  • Avoid smoking for 48 hours after your operation to prevent coughing and possible bleeding.
  • No alcohol for five days after surgery.
  • Do not raise your arms high above your shoulders or do any heavy lifting for two weeks.
  • You may drive a car with power steering after one week as long as you are not taking any pain medications.
  • You may sleep on your back or side; not on your stomach.
  • Do not sit in the sun or heat for one month, since this could cause excessive swelling and firmness.
  • BATHING: You may bathe or shower after the bandages have been removed (usually after your first postoperative visit. The doctor will give you bathing instructions).
  • Activities requiring raising arms (i.e., golf tennis, swimming) may be resumed after four weeks.
  • You should wear a non-underwire bra at all times for the first week.

 

Note: If you notice any signs of increasing firmness of one or both breasts; even months after your operation, please notify us promptly so that treatment can be started.

Please feel free to call us with any other questions you may have 413-794-5363 or toll-free at 866-567-3685

 

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS

  • Take medications (pain medicines and antibiotics) according to the instructions on bottles. Have someone else give you your pain medicine according to the correct time intervals. While under its influence, you might forget and take it too often.
  • The period of greatest discomfort generally occurs for two to three days after surgery. Thereafter, you may find that you need the pain medicine less frequently.
  • The drains placed in your breasts during surgery have been removed. You can expect some drainage for at least one week after surgery. If the drainage becomes thick, milky and develops a foul odor, please call us.
  • Call your doctor if you have:
    • Severe pain not responding to pain medications
    • More swelling and/or pain on one side than the other
    • Bandages that seem too tight.
    • Any other questions or problems that should arise.
  • Avoid smoking for 48 hours after your operation to prevent coughing and possible bleeding.
  • No alcohol while taking pain medication and/or at least for five days after surgery.
  • Do not raise your arms high above your shoulders or do any heavy lifting for two weeks.
  • You may drive a car with power steering after one week, as long as you are not taking any pain medications.
  • You may sleep on your back or side, but not on your stomach.
  • Do not sit in the sun or heat for one month, since this could cause excessive swelling and firmness. 
  • BATHING: You may bathe or shower after the bandages have been removed (usually after your first postoperative visit). The doctor will give you bathing instructions.
  • Activities requiring raising arms (i.e., golf tennis, swimming) may be resumed after four weeks.
  • You should wear a bra at all times for the first week.

 

Note: If you notice any signs of increasing firmness of one or both breasts, even months after your operation, please notify us promptly so that treatment can be started. We can be reached weekdays from 8:30 a.m. – 5: p.m. at 413-794-5363 or 866-567-3685. After hours, please call the main number for our 24-hour answering service.

 

 

Return to top


What should I know about Brow lift surgery?

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery because it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed, use Tylenol instead (i.e., NO Alka Seltzer, Anacin, Ascriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon, Compound, Fiorinal, Dristan, Empirin, Excedrin, Midol, Sine-Aid, Sine-Off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminidin, Vanquish, etc., If in doubt, check with us.)
  • You may color or bleach your hair up to, but no later than, one day before surgery. No further coloring until approximately four weeks after surgery. Do not invest in an expensive hairdo immediately before surgery.
  • Smokers should QUIT. If you cannot, attempt to cut down to three, four or less cigarettes daily for two weeks before surgery in order to reduce postoperative complications caused by smoking.
  • Report any signs of cold, infection, boils or postules appearing one week before surgery.
  • Arrange for a responsible adult to drive you home after surgery.

NIGHT BEFORE SURGERY

  • NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK AFTER MIDNIGHT OR OTHERWISE INSTRUCTED.

 

DAY OF SURGERY

  • No make-up and do not cream your face.
  • Do not take medications of any kind (except what has been prescribed for you, i.e., heart, blood pressure or diabetic medication, etc.)
  • Leave all personal belongings at home and wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing which do not have to be put on over your head.
  • Bring a large scarf and sunglasses to wear after your operation.
  • You must have a responsible adult to drive for you after surgery. You must have a responsible adult spend the first 24 hour with you. Additional instructions and prescriptions can be given to the person calling for you. Such prescriptions should be filled promptly. If you have any questions before your operation, please call our office weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at 413-794-5363 or 866-567-3685. After hours, please call the main number for our 24-hour answering service.

 

AFTER YOUR SURGERY

  • Keep your head elevated on two pillows for 24 hours to decrease swelling.
  • Intermittent ice compresses for 48 hours after surgery.
  • You may go to the bathroom.
  • Keep dressing intact for 72 hours
  • Take medications according to instructions on the bottle. If taking strong narcotics, or if other pain medications make you feel “spacey” or drowsy, have a responsible adult give you your medicines according to the proper time intervals. Under such circumstances, you could forget and take them too often.
  • Soft diet requiring little or no chewing. Lots of liquids.
  • NO HOT OR WARM COMPRESSES TO FACE !!!!
  • You can expect:
    • Moderate discomfort - use pain medicine (see #3 above). 
    • Moderate swelling. 
    • Black and blue discoloration.
    • Bloodshot eyes.
    • Slight signs of blood on bandage. 
  • Call the office if you have: 
    • Severe pain not responding to medications. 
    • Marked swelling, or obviously more swelling on one side than the other.
    • Bright red spots on bandage which continue to enlarge. 
    • Bandages that seem too tight. 
    • Any other questions or problems that arise.
  • Avoid smoking for 7 days after your operation to prevent coughing and possible bleeding.
  • No alcohol for 7 days after surgery.
  • You may wear make-up after checking with the office.
  • May shower in 72 hours and gently wash hair.
  • You may color or bleach your hair four weeks after your surgery is completely healed.
  • Avoid sports and strenuous activity for four weeks.
  • Avoid prolonged exposure to sun and heat for one month to avoid swelling.
  • Feel free to call our office at any time. We want you to be as comfortable as possible during your healing period.

Return to top


What should I know about Hand surgery?

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery because it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed, use Tylenol instead ( i.e., No Alka Seltzer, Anacin, Acriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon Compound, Fiornal, Dristan, Excedrin, Midol, Sine-Aid, Sine-off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminicin, Vanquish, etc. If in doubt, check with us.)
  • If general anesthesia is planned smokers should quit. Try to cut down to no more than three, four or less cigarettes per day for two weeks before surgery to reduce postoperative coughing.
  • Report any signs of a cold and/or fever within one week of your surgery.
  • You must arrange for someone to drive you home after surgery, and stay with you for 24 hours.
  • Usually hand surgery is done as an outpatient. This means you will have your surgery and return home the same day.
  • Pre-testing is required and usually consists of blood work, chest x-ray, and possibly an EKG; depending on your age.

 

NIGHT BEFORE SURGERY

  • NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK AFTER MIDNIGHT, UNLESS OTHERWISE INSTRUCTED.

 

DAY OF SURGERY

  • Do not take medications of any kind (unless instructed or prescribed by the doctor), unless it is your heart or blood pressure medications. If unsure, check with our office.
  • Leave all personal belongings at home and wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing that will fit over your arm since it will have a large dressing.
  • Remove all rings and nail polish before surgery.
  • You must have someone drive you home after surgery.
  • You must have someone spend the first 24 hours with you. Additional instructions will be given to that person.

 

AFTER YOUR SURGERY

  • Bedrest with your hand elevated on several pillows so that it is above the level of the heart. This prevents swelling which causes pain. Even when you are up and around you must keep your hand elevated.
  • Take medications according to instructions. Pain medications may make you feel "spacey" or drowsy. Have a responsible adult give you your medicines according to the proper time intervals. Under such circumstances, you could forget and take them too often or not at all.
  • DO NOT GET THE DRESSING OR SPLINT WET.
  • The splint will usually remain in place for one week. Some tendon repairs require you to wear a cast six to eight weeks. Some procedures will require splinting.
  • After the splint is removed, you may begin to open and close your fingers a few times each hour; unless given other instructions.
  • Sutures are removed between one and two weeks.
  • Call us at 413-794-5363 if you develop any of the following:

– Bleeding 

– Fever 

– Numbness of the hand or fingertips. 

– Change of color on the fingertips. 

– Excessive pain not relieved with pain medication.

  • After sutures are removed, continued elevation of the hand, whenever possible, will help control swelling which may occur for a period of three to eight weeks.
  • A removable wrist splint may be used for one to two weeks.
  • You may experience some swelling and/or numbness coming back after doing excessive housecleaning, cutting the lawn, washing the floor, etc.; between six weeks and three months. If this happens, discontinue the work and rest your hand. OFFICE VISITS Your first visit may be at one week after your surgery. If you have any questions or problems, feel free to call us at 413-794-5363 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. or toll free 866-567-3685. After hours, please call our main number for our 24 hour answering service.

 

Return to top


What should I know about Rhinoplasty (nasal surgery)?

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery because it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed, use Tylenol instead.(i.e., No AlkaSeltzer, Anacin, Ascriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon Compound, Fiorinal, Dristan, Empirin, Excedrin, Midol, Sine-Aid, Sine-Off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminicin, Vanquish, etc. (If in doubt, check with us.) This includes herbal medications or herbal teas and supplements.
  • No Vitamin E for two weeks prior to surgery because it may also interfere with the clotting process. Also, no cough or cold medicines are to be taken one week beforehand.
  • Do not take or smoke any intoxicating substances or drugs for two weeks prior to surgery.
  • Smokers should stop smoking at least two weeks before surgery to reduce postoperative complications caused by smoking.
  • Report any signs of a cold, infection, boils or pustules appearing one week before surgery.
  • Arrange for someone to drive you to your home, hotel or motel after surgery.

 

NIGHT BEFORE SURGERY

  • NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK AFTER 12:00 MIDNIGHT, UNLESS OTHERWISE INSTRUCTED.

 

DAY OF SURGERY

  • No make-up and don't cream face.
  • Do not take medication of any kind (except what has been prescribed for you, i.e., heart, blood pressure or diabetic medication, etc.)
  • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing that do not have to be put on over your head.
  • Bring a large scarf and sunglasses to wear after your operation.
  • You MUST have a responsible adult to drive for you after surgery.
  • You must have a responsible adult spend the next 24 hours with you. Additional instructions and prescriptions can be given to the person calling for you. Such prescriptions should be filled promptly. If you have any questions before your surgery, please call our office weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at (413) 794-5363 or (866) 567-3685. After hours, please call our main number for our 24 hr answering service.

 

AFTER YOUR OPERATION

  • Bed rest with head elevated on two pillows for 24 hours.
  • You may go to the bathroom.
  • Take medications according to instructions on the bottle . If taking strong narcotics or on other pain medications that make you feel "spacey" or drowsy, have a responsible adult give you your medicines according to the proper time intervals. Under such circumstances you could forget and take them too often. 4. You may wash your hair on the second day after surgery, providing that you can wash it or have it washed in the face up position. (Bending forward could start a nose bleed.) Dry with towel or cool dryer. Do not sit under a hot dryer.
  • Soft diet requiring little or no chewing. Lots of liquids. Avoid very hot foods or liquids.
  • NO HOT OR WARM COMPRESSES TO FACE!! You may use COLD compresses across your eyes.
  • You can expect:

– Initial nosebleed for about four hours. Change "drip pad" gauzes under your nose as needed. 

– Moderate discomfort — use a recommended pain medicine. (see above.)

– Swelling and black and blue around your eyes; sometimes more on the second or third day after surgery, than the first.

– Bloodshot "whites" of your eyes. (This is the same as bruising of the skin, except that under the clear covering of the eyes it looks red instead of black and blue.)

  • Call your doctor if you have:

– Severe pain not responding to medications.

– Prolonged profuse bleeding (soaking more than five drip pads per hour after four hours).

– Any other questions or problems that arise.

  • During the first week following surgery:

– Do not bend your head down.

– Do not strain or do anything that requires significant effort.

  • Avoid smoking for seven days after surgery as it irritates the lining of the nose and causes coughing; both of which could bring on a late nosebleed.
  • No alcohol for ten days after surgery.
  • No nose drops for ten days after surgery.
  • Do not blow your nose hard for two weeks after surgery. After the first week you may gently cleanse your nostrils with a moist Q-tip.
  • If you happen to sneeze, it usually causes no harm. Don't try to prevent a sneeze.
  • You may wear any make-up, providing it does not interfere with the splint or tapes.
  • Avoid sports and other strenuous activity for four weeks.
  • Avoid prolonged exposure to sun and/or heat for one month to prevent prolonged swelling.
  • Feel free to call upon us at any time. We want you to be as comfortable as possible during your healing period.

 

OFFICE VISITS

  • First: One or two days following surgery if the doctor thinks it is necessary to see you.
  • Second: Approximately one week after surgery, at which time your nasal splint will be removed and you will be given a lighter tape splint.

 

Return to top


What should I know about Skin graft surgery?

AFTER YOUR SKIN GRAFT SURGERY

  • Your first dressing change usually occurs within five to seven days after surgery. If your first dressing change was done in the hospital, the VNA will be arranged to do your dressing changes at home.
  • Skin grafts generally take two to three weeks to heal with xeroform gauze dressings. Do not get discouraged if your wound takes longer to heal. Everyone heals differently, and some medical problems may cause you to heal slower.
  • If your skin graft is on one of your lower extremities there is no standing in place. You may walk with an ace wrap approximately seven to ten days after surgery.
  • When not walking, you should be sitting with your leg elevated above your heart. This will help reduce the swelling and assist in healing. If your skin graft is on an upper extremity, try to keep it elevated as much as possible.
  • When your skin graft is completely healed, you will need to apply skin lotion at least once a day to the donor and recipient site.
  • You will be back to normal activity in about two to three months.
  • If you have any questions before your surgery, please call our office weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at 413-794-5363 or 866-567-3685. After hours, please call our main number for our 24-hour answering service

Return to top


What should I know about Facelift surgery?

BEFORE YOUR SURGERY

  • No aspirin or medicines containing aspirin for two weeks before surgery because it interferes with normal blood clotting. If needed, use Tylenol instead (i.e., NO Alka Seltzer, Anacin, Ascriptin, BC, Bufferin, Cheracol Capsules, Cope, Coricidin, Darvon, Compound, Fiorinal, Dristan, Empirin, Excedrin, Midol, Sine-Aid, Sine-Off, Percodan, Stendin, Toradol, Triaminidin, Vanquish, etc., If in doubt, check with us.)
  • You may color or bleach your hair up to, but no later than, one day before surgery. No further coloring until approximately four weeks after surgery. Do not invest in an expensive hairdo immediately before surgery.
  • Smokers should QUIT. If you cannot, attempt to cut down to three, four or less cigarettes daily for two weeks before surgery in order to reduce postoperative complications caused by smoking.
  • Report any signs of cold, infection, boils or postules appearing one week before surgery.
  • Arrange for a responsible adult to drive you home after surgery.

 

NIGHT BEFORE SURGERY

  • NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK AFTER MIDNIGHT OR WHEN OTHERWISE INSTRUCTED.

 

DAY OF SURGERY

  • No make-up and do not cream your face.
  • Do not take medications of any kind (except what has been prescribed for you, i.e., heart, blood pressure or diabetic medication, etc.)
  • Leave all personal belongings at home and wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing which do not have to be put on over your head.
  • Bring a large scarf and sunglasses to wear after your operation. 
  • You must have a responsible adult to drive for you after surgery. You must have a responsible adult spend the first 24 hour with you. Additional instructions and prescriptions can be given to the person calling for you. Such prescriptions should be filled promptly. If you have any questions before your operation, please call our office weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at (413) 794-5363 or (866) 567-3685. After hours, please call the main number for our 24 hr answering service.

 

AFTER YOUR SURGERY

  • Bed rest with your head elevated on two pillows for 24 hours.
  • You may go to the bathroom.
  • Take medications according to instructions on the bottle. If taking strong narcotics, or if other pain medications make you feel “spacey” or drowsy, have a responsible adult give you your medicines according to the proper time intervals. Under such circumstances, you could forget and take them too often.
  • Soft diet requiring little or no chewing. Lots of liquids. Avoid very hot foods or liquids.
  • NO HOT OR WARM COMPRESSES TO FACE !!!!
  • You can expect: 

– Moderate discomfort - use a recommended pain medicine (see above). 

– Moderate swelling. 

– Black and blue discoloration. 

– Bloodshot eyes. 

– Slight signs of blood on bandage.

  • Call the office if you have: 

– Severe pain not responding to medications. 

– Marked swelling, or obviously more swelling on one side than the other. 

– Bright red spots on bandage which continue to enlarge. 

– Bandages that seem too tight. 

– Any other questions or problems that arise.

  • Avoid smoking for 7 days after your operation to prevent coughing and possible bleeding.
  • No alcohol for 7 days after surgery.
  • You may wear make-up after checking with the office.
  • You may color or bleach your hair four weeks after your surgery is completely healed.
  • Avoid sports and strenuous activity for four weeks.
  • Avoid prolonged exposure to sun and heat for one month to avoid swelling.
  • Feel free to call our office at any time. We want you to be as comfortable as possible during your healing period.

Return to top